12 April 2016 Talk at London Book Fair: China, Urbanisation, Infrastructure, and Trains

12 April 2016 Talk at London Book Fair: China, Urbanisation, Infrastructure, and Trains

It’s not a David Feng talk if it’s not about trains. With the population of just over two Londons moving from the countryside to the city every year across China, something will have to carry them. And whilst the country may have pretty much the largest national motorway network on the planet, it’s also home to over two-thirds of the world’s HSR tracks.

This already-massive network — at 19,000 km (11,806 miles) — is expected to grow even more by 2020, with figures by then to hit 30,000 km (18,641 miles) for the entire nationwide HSR network. With most trunk lines running at no less than 300 km/h (186 mph), this is going to be one of the most efficient ways to get across the country.

My talk on 12 April 2016 at the London Book Fair introduced urbanisation in China and its effects, with a focus on infrastructure.

David Feng to Talk About China and Urbanisation at London Book Fair

David Feng to Talk About China and Urbanisation at London Book Fair

I will be talking about China and urbanisation at the London Book Fair, which will be held at Olympia Exhibition Centre. For further details as to where you can find me, follow me on Twitter (@DavidFeng).

I am expected to talk around 15:55 on Tuesday, 12 April 2016, although I might begin a few minutes earlier depending actual situations, so if you’re coming, I advise you to come around 5-10 minutes before time.

The talk on urbanisation will also coincide with the release of a new series of books on China urbanisation. In addition to remaining active in the China media world, I will also be taking an increasingly closer look at China’s urbanisation.

Being an Active Part of the International Conference on China and the Changing Geopolitics of Global Communication in London

Being an Active Part of the International Conference on China and the Changing Geopolitics of Global Communication in London

Call it a perfect transition from London to Beijing as I prepare to head back to China — taking part in an academic conference organised both by the University of Westminster in London, and the Communication University of China in Beijing.

This time, I was both Chair and Speaker in the same event, and also had an opportunity to ask an academic colleague about his presentation which would ring bells all over China’s younger generation born in the 1990s.

Beijing Subway, Trains, and More: My 04 April 2016 Talk at the London Transport Museum

Beijing Subway, Trains, and More: My 04 April 2016 Talk at the London Transport Museum

It had every last David Feng element possibly conceivable on the planet. Trains. Subways. HSR trainsets. Audiences. Comparisons between the Metropolitan line and Beijing’s Line 1 and the Batong Line extension. The audience at the London Transport Museum was wowed for an hour as I did my shtick — a one-hour presentation on From A to B in London and Beijing. Everything was fully localised for a London audience. Miles per hour appeared next to their SI equivalents, and the Victoria line was shown its Beijing counterpart.

In the London Transport Museum’s Cubic Theatre, over 80 were seated as they discovered how the Chinese rails and roads worked. I first started with a fact-and-distance check: the easternmost end of the bridge by the Tube platforms at Upminster, in essence the closest point on the Tube network to Beijing from inside the M25, was 5,302⅔ miles (8,099.2 km) away. That station was a new late 2015 addition: Changping Xishankou station.

David Feng in LSE Bridging Minds Symposium About “Under the Dome” Documentary

Posted by on Mar 15, 2015 in Academic Life, Environment | No Comments
David Feng in LSE Bridging Minds Symposium About “Under the Dome” Documentary

I recently took part in the Bridging Minds Symposium as organised by the China Development Society of LSE (Student Union). My interview, which formed part of the “e-symposium” (this time, the event was more a series of online interviews and features), was about the recent Under the Dome documentary by former Chinese Central Television host Chai Jing.

In my interview, I noted that Chai used the kind of down-to-earth language not used by government (it more sense to the average commoner). But I also noted that the timing of the film meant that nobody (especially long-time observers of China) would be surprised if it ended up silenced — as it was trying to grab the microphone at a time when the meetings of China’s political advisory body and national parliament, were looming.

David Feng Presented at Cardiff University on Mediatised Messages in China

Posted by on Feb 7, 2015 in Academic Life, United Kingdom | No Comments
David Feng Presented at Cardiff University on Mediatised Messages in China

I joined Cardiff University on 06 February 2015 in the First Annual Conference UK-China Media and Cultural Studies Association, with quite a “it-made-you-think” title, Chinese Media and Cultural Studies: Consumption, Content and Crisis., getting academic discourse going.

My main research remains with general media in China, in particular social media in the country, but I also try to “spread out” into other closely related fields, including mediatised political messages of China. These include analysing the message that’s being conveyed both through propaganda posters and by political leaders. In this very presentation I did — What’s Zhongnanhai Saying to Us? — I took a look at the messages sent by three past and present Chinese presidents. Some of us know that current Chinese President Xi Jinping uses very down-to-earth language, an obvious first for China in recent years. This I presented both by using a word cloud of keywords, and also by using a more “regular” table.

The questions were as much about the message as it was about the politics — I was the only presenter in my group of three academic colleagues that was asked all questions. My responses were as objective as possible; I mentioned Xi warranted credit due to what he had actually done (certainly when compared to previous administrations); I also answered how certain social and political topics were seen quite differently in a Chinese way that in a way that would be seen in countries such as the UK and the US.

David Feng to Talk to Chinese Students in London on Studying Tips

David Feng, Visiting Academic and Visiting Lecturer at the University of Westminster, will be speaking to the Chinese Students and Scholars Association of the University of Westminster on 12 October 2014. The event begins at 15:00 and will be held in Room A.1.04 of the Harrow Campus.

David will be focusing on how Chinese students can be excel in the UK in their studies. He will share his 12 years in Switzerland, 10 years in China as a student, combined with teaching lessons in China, Switzerland and the UK, to students from over 40 countries and territories, and will include advice on what students should do to improve their marks, but also to improve their experiences studying and living overseas.

iOuch

Would you work in a place with the slogan Achieve goals or the Sun will no longer rise? (It’s both a scary and a pathetic slogan — Wikipedians would also tag it factually inaccurate. I myself have missed tonnes of goals and I’ve never made the Sun not come out!)

Most of us know about the crass violations of workers’ rights and dignity at Foxconn, where Apple’s iDevices are churned out in record time. But to me, it was just a violation that “had to be swallowed” or even, worse, “accepted as fact”. The full scale of how scary things were weren’t made clear to me until I attended a talk by Dr Jenny Chan of the University of Oxford. She also focused on corporate misbehaviour in the talk, in addition to giving us all an idea of how scary things were on the assembly line.