Upcoming China Media Centre Seminar: Michel Hockx Talk on 24 February 2016

Upcoming China Media Centre Seminar: Michel Hockx Talk on 24 February 2016

Once again, the China Media Centre has a seminar ready for all, and like last time, when I chaired the highly interactive talk with Vincent Ni, I’ll be chairing this one as well. We’re really honoured to have Professor Michel Hockx from SOAS with us.

As usual, this event is open to all members of the public.

Here’s the details:

China Media Centre 2016 Spring Seminar
WEB LITERATURE AND WORLD LITERATURE
Speaker: Prof Michel Hockx
Date: Wednesday, 24 February 2016
Time: 14:00 – 16:00 (with refreshments to follow)
Venue: A6.03, Maria Howlett Building, University of Westminster Harrow Campus
Chair: Dr David Feng

OPEN TO ALL

Upcoming China Media Centre Seminar: Vincent Ni Talk on 02 December 2015

Upcoming China Media Centre Seminar: Vincent Ni Talk on 02 December 2015

For academic year 2015-2016 here at the University of Westminster, I will be in charge of seminars at the China Media Centre. We’re very honoured to have Vincent Ni as our first speaker, and I’ll actually be chairing this very one on 02 December 2015.

Here’s the details:

China Media Centre 2015 Winter Seminar
“JUST WRITE WHAT YOU’VE SEEN”:
 THE BBC AND ITS CHINA COVERAGE
Speaker: Mr Vincent Ni
Date: Wednesday, 02 December 2015
Time: 14:00 – 16:00 (with refreshments to follow)
Venue: A6.07, Maria Howlett Building, University of Westminster Harrow Campus
Chair: Dr David Feng

OPEN TO ALL

Tuanjiehu Community English Event: Knowledge for the Old and the Young

Posted by on May 31, 2014 in Beijing, China, Languages | No Comments
Tuanjiehu Community English Event: Knowledge for the Old and the Young

I joined fellow Radio Beijing co-host Alison Zhou onstage at the Tuanjiehu community’s English event, when we were given the stage not only to promote the newly-created Handbook of Everyday English for Beijing residents. The event was held in the morning hours of 31 May 2014 at the Tuanjiehu local community activities centre.

When you come to think of it, it was a big deal at the end of the day. Both city authorities in charge for international affairs and Radio Beijing, as well as leading English experts in town, took the time to come together and to create a book for the rest of us, telling people how English should best be spoken and used.

Kids, seniors and local residents all joined us in the free two-hour session to get people more and more excited about learning English. Many said they loved listening to our spoken English as they could really learn from this. The event finished at 11:30 with a commitment to take such events to more places around the city.

Taking Part in an End-of-Year Academic Book Release Event

Taking Part in an End-of-Year Academic Book Release Event

On 24 December 2013, I took part in the rather longly-worded Press Release of Blue Book of Global Media: Annual Report on the Development of Global Media (2013) and New Media Industries Frontiers and Combined Discussion on Worldwide Communications and New Media Development. (What a mouthful!)

I was here as I was part of a new Chinese-language book on the media, and especially social media. Titled New Media Industries Frontiers (2013), my bit, from page 71, takes a look at China’s social media development and trends.

In particular, I mentioned that the rise of new social media tools, such as WeChat, will change the audience of a message. On Weibo and Twitter, for example, unless you have a private account, what you post will be seen by others — even those you don’t follow or are friends with. On WeChat this is different altogether, as it is seen only with your friends, and nobody you don’t know (unless they’ve copied-and-pasted your message as a rather complicated form of a repost). So whereas a message spreads faster on Weibo and Twitter, it has less reach and impact in comparison if posted just on WeChat. On the other hand, the two are different environments: Weibo is much more for the general public, whilst WeChat is much more between friends.

Celebrating the Successful Hosting of the Games at the Beijing Planning Exhibition Hall

Celebrating the Successful Hosting of the Games at the Beijing Planning Exhibition Hall

Looking odd here? All red, white, and yellow? Read further inside this post to see why this is the case!

Yesterday, the Beijing Planning Exhibition Hall, where I’m at as part of my Beijing 2008 commitment, had a rather special evening. Virtually nobody at the exhibition hall had any real in-depth international experience, and yet they wanted to be as multilingual as possible — those posts around town in a great variety of languages might very well have been the reason why. They picked me as event host in a gala that included a lot of dancing and singing — in front of everyone, city officials (such as a deputy mayor) included!

Me working at this place meant that I often had to deal in matters directly related to very high-level visits. In comparison, hosting a city mayor was far less of a tall order for me. I had to, however, do my bit in English, German, French, Italian and Korean, and you knew a simple Google Translate might not always do the job well. Even more importantly, I had to remember as many phrases off by heart as possible.

To make this a uniquely Chinese event, I was dressed in very Chinese shades — red for me, and yellow for the other host. Those of us who knew China well, though, wouldn’t be surprised: the emperor of dynasties past would always choose yellow, and red was what was donned during festive, not “warning”, events. So I do admit I’d look a little weird in “all-red” in the West, but in China, this would be far less of an issue.

Shenzhen: Wow City

Posted by on Dec 1, 2006 in Guangdong, Shenzhen | No Comments
Shenzhen: Wow City

By some weird (yet also wonderful) development of things, the media company I am an intern in has decided to send me to the city of Shenzhen — to train, as I’ve said before, beauty contest contestants. Knowing I was a Swiss-Chinese (Swiss by passport, Chinese by birth), they decided I knew enough languages — and wanted to teach these contestants mostly English, but also German, French, and Italian. (They already knew Mandarin Chinese!)

I had a rather sleepless night — I managed to be sleepless until 12:00 noon! No sweaty palms holding the mic as I told a crowd of 100 contestants how to say this, that, or the other thing, in the right language. Plus, it wasn’t the first time I was onstage: my debut was ten years back!

Then it was an afternoon nap. One of my best friends, Kevin, tried to come on the train down from Guangzhou to Shenzhen, but it didn’t work out. No problem: I got an early ride the next morning via central Shenzhen to the airport.

Shenzhen is this place that is purely mind-boggling. When I was here first in 1992 (over the border from Hong Kong), it was still a “half-baked” city, with even the airport still “too new” to be considered complete. Fast forward 14 years, and now we’ve towers, towers, everywhere.

22 March 2004 of Lenovo Tianji English Speaking Contest

22 March 2004 of Lenovo Tianji English Speaking Contest

The hosting of the Dyned Cup Finals late last year was so good, that the President of the Student Council for my university’s English Department decided to handpick me to host the Lenovo Tianji English Speaking Contest, which was held yesterday.

I was also very much encouraged to be onstage again after what became an outpouring of congratulations almost right after the last such event finished — both from foreign teachers and from locals, as well as people behind the scenes at the event.

This time, my stage was the main hall in a massive, “audio visual hall”, which was much larger than the last event. This meant facing even more people in the audience. It was, once again, a great time.

Hosting the Christmas and New Year Gala in the University

Hosting the Christmas and New Year Gala in the University

Yesterday was my second time to host this combined Christmas and New Year Gala here at the University of International Business and Economics in Beijing, for international students. In spite of the diversity of all students, the language used, of course, was Chinese, as we were all in China.

We had three other co-presenters: one from Africa, and two from South Korea. This was an incredibly multicultural mix, and I was so pleased to host them again, after being recommended onstage for the 2002 edition.

As I took this event quite seriously, I was the sole presenter dressed in suit and tie! But everyone looked their very best. Word of this also went to a few new local Chinese friends I had just made, and they sent in their congratulations on the event.

05 December 2003 Hosting of Dyned Cup (Beijing, China)

Posted by on Dec 20, 2003 in Beijing, Public Events | No Comments
05 December 2003 Hosting of Dyned Cup (Beijing, China)

The Dyned Cup English Speaking Contest was successfully held on the Level 3 International Convention Centre of the Cheng Xin Building in the evening hours of 05 December 2003.

The entire Dyned Cup speaking contest took place over the course of a month.

All schools within the university held their competitions from 17 November 2003 through to 27 November 2003. This was well-received by students, in particular those who just entered the university. After intense competition, both at the school and university-wide semifinal stages, 11 contestants from the English, Humanities, Foreign Languages, Business and Law Schools took part in the finals on 05 December 2003. All 11 contestants were able to exhibit their English language abilities in topic presentations, questions and answer sessions, and the impromptu presentation, winning applause from the audience.