David Feng: From Swiss Visa to Swiss Passport

David Feng: From Swiss Visa to Swiss Passport

You’re seeing a black-and-white copy of the first part of my Swiss visa on my old, and now expired, Chinese passport. That was what I used to come to the Alpine republic. When I left for Beijing in 2000, I left Zürich Airport with the classic red booklet — the Swiss passport. The Swiss cross of worldwide fame was no longer restricted to a classical Wappe; it had taken over the entire cover of the passport.

Switzerland has given me so much for my past 12 years there. The country still continues to be part of what I do, day in, day out. Not sold? Here’s what it gave me…

David in London and the UK: Progress in Pictures

David in London and the UK: Progress in Pictures

I’m headed back to Beijing in around a month, after all these years in the UK. Beijing, indeed, is the place I was born in. I’ve always kept my homeland and Beijing close to me — and it shows in all the involvements I’ve been part of. In the past two years, I’ve been more involved academically, am a closer part of the London Chinese community, have been part of events and meetups amongst locals in London, have been closer to UK media and the rail world, and through all this, now understand the UK better — not least also through my travels to all 32 London Boroughs and The City, as well as all lines and stations on the London Underground and the DLR.

Beijing is the city of the future. Once back “in the Jing”, I’m going to be involved in the Chinese capital as never before. My main career is obviously going to be rail-centred, but I’ll also keep a firm footing in academia, Beijing’s international events, and particularly the Swiss community in Beijing and across all of China. The Beijing & Zhangjiakou 2022 Winter Olympics and Paralympics, as well as the building of the northern China megalopolis around Beijing, Tianjin, and Hebei, are stories that will define our time and are unique in their own right. This is where I’ll also come in with my own experience and know-how, as I do my part in making China and its people better off and living better lives daily.

Here’s a look back at 25 pictures of two highly successful years in Britain.

2016: A Year of Remembrance, Gratitude, and Progress

Posted by on Jan 1, 2016 in David Feng Views | No Comments
2016: A Year of Remembrance, Gratitude, and Progress

Dear friends from across the world,

The year 2016 is with us. For me, this is a year of remembrance, gratitude, and progress.

In this new year, I shall look back at five years of marriage, and twenty years since approaching the microphone in front of an audience, and also of clicking my way online. I do treasure these precious moments of promising the love of my life my eternal commitment, of sharing thoughts with people, and of being a member of the Internet community. These are now fundamental and inseparable parts of my life. It is true that so much has happened since our promise of being for one another for life, my first speech, and Internet presence.

Chairing the China Media Centre’s First Seminar for Academic Year 2015-2016 – Speaker: Vincent Ni

Chairing the China Media Centre’s First Seminar for Academic Year 2015-2016 – Speaker: Vincent Ni

The average academic talk is where you’ve students all facing one way, staring at a speaker, and then trying to make sense of this. Then you realise that when I do seminars and events, I wanted to make it the exact way both the speaker and attendees want it. We decided shifting tables so that most of us ended up looking at one other — much like a semi-roundtable — would be the best idea. And that’s exactly how the classroom was arranged for the first China Media Centre seminar, which took place today.

Vincent Ni, who’s now with the BBC World Service, came today as speaker to deliver an extremely insightful talk — insightful as it was also thought-provoking and very much what you expected from a distinguished journalist with a lot of experience. He has covered the elections in Myanmar / Burma, the Arab Spring, and much more. He has also worked previously in China-based media, moving recently onwards to media based in the UK.

Ten Days into November 2015…

Posted by on Nov 10, 2015 in Site Updates | No Comments
Ten Days into November 2015…

…and I can easily say this has been the absolute best month yet my end for probably the best part of 12 years, if not ever. Of course, nothing beats hosting a brilliant arts expo in London about China’s Hebei province. But even off-stage, there’s still a lot of things that got improved — and now, it’s all about the blogs, too.

I do admit that running a huge diversity of blogs can be a bit of a chore, especially for those which you post in separate locations. This is why I am merging all non-Street Level China blogs onto davidfeng.com with immediate effect. First to go onto this new centralised base on davidfeng.com will be my Switzerland-oriented blog, 8152blog.ch, as well as the That Building… blog, and the Chang’anjie Media Notebook. All other blogs will be merged here onto davidfeng.com no later than 29 December 2015.

Merging them onto this site brings very obvious advantages. The best that can happen is a unified interface, along with easier access to all other pages and posts of relevance. Finally, having them on the main davidfeng.com site means they will likely be translated into the other site languages.

David Feng: To Love and Be Loved

Posted by on Nov 1, 2015 in David Feng Views | No Comments
David Feng: To Love and Be Loved

I enter November 2015 completely refreshed, as I realise that only by loving what you do to the fullest, will you get the most results. My end, this includes just about anything — from emceeing events to academic research.

Facebook alerted me to a very worrying trend — that as you are constantly denied what you want, worries and eventually hate will breed. Ultimately, hurt people hurt people (nope, that’s not a typo!). I’ve been in this devilish cycle for a fair bit of time. My wife, Tracy, grew increasingly worried at a trend she saw as excessive pessimism.

Tracy got me home and we had a heart-to-heart on all issues impacting me — many, many times. She wanted me to be more active, and so got me involved in a great number of projects. I had lots of hour-long calls with other members of the family. Slowly, things started to change. The event that Tracy encouraged me to host on 31 October 2015 was the tipping point. Fyvie Hall was awash with mutual appreciation even amongst total strangers.

It’s Here: Simplified Chinese Version of davidfeng.com

Posted by on Oct 15, 2015 in Official David Feng Annoucement | No Comments
It’s Here: Simplified Chinese Version of davidfeng.com

It’s been a month of very hard work on this site. This is whilst nearly a hundred site elements get translated from English to simplified Chinese. It meant working up to 05:00 (in the morning hours here in London!… maybe even more!), but it was worth it.

This is the first time in the history of my site — in any form — that a non-English language version has been translated in full. Obviously, with simplified Chinese serving mostly the Chinese mainland market, it made sense to apply the extra tests to ensure that content was visible, and remained visible, from mainland China, which simply meant (a) translating it in a way that made sense and (b) ensuring it was compatible with Chinese law. Obviously, as this site remains largely apolitical, the latter was less a hurdle to clear than you think it might be.

Over three-quarters of all content have been translated; the rest should be ready before the weekend is over. During the first week, it will obviously be a case where you might encounter the odd dead link — or get a link that you click in Chinese, taking you to the English version of the page. Rest assured, there will be a full inspection of both languages of the site, and any minor errors you run into today will be gone. A general check in terms of grammar for the Chinese site will be up next, and then, part of the site will be integrated into my WeChat public presence. For now, huanying ni (欢迎你) — welcome — to the new site in simplified Chinese. It has been incredibly difficult to get stuff right at times, but the work more than paid off. Last but not least, all posts in simplified Chinese will migrate to the new page no later than 29 December 2015.

Putting the Finishing Touches to the Greatest Revamp Ever

Posted by on Sep 21, 2015 in Official David Feng Annoucement | No Comments
Putting the Finishing Touches to the Greatest Revamp Ever

In September 1996 — I think if I remember it clearly, around 16 September 1996 — I started learning how to in essence hand code “raw” HTML and make that a site. It wasn’t easy, and even if it was done, it produced some pretty raw results. Not nice, obviously, but for 1996, it was a success anyway. But what worked in the past isn’t going to do quite as well today, especially on the Internet.

Fast forward to the present day — just a few months shy of 2016, and next year will mark the 20th year I’m online with a website. I’ve decided to take this opportunity to undertake and complete the largest revamp ever — and to completely redo it, so that it is ready for at least the next five years.

I hope you like this new edition; I put in the best part of a full month into it. This new site will make much more sense for wider screens, mobile devices, and tablets. And I hope you love this new, redone site as much as I enjoyed making it.

A Public Letter of Apology for All of Society

A Public Letter of Apology for All of Society

I, David Feng, do recognise that I may very well have made decisions, or said things, that have, in the past, irritated people — to whatever extent, be it a temporary or long-term grudge. Whilst appreciating it is quite hard to satisfy everywhere, I do still hope, however, that there be a chance where I can say to those whom I might have crossed paths and hurt in any way, a public, honest and sincere SORRY from the bottom of my heart.

I’d like to take this chance to “drop my load” of negative, unpleasant experiences in the past with this sincere apology. I’d like to move on from this point forward, and serve my family, place of work, and society as a whole. I’m not a fan of polemical criticism or attacks; I’d much prefer that there were real, tangible, doable solutions. There’s a lot of issues in this world, and I’d like to solve as many of them as I can.

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