Taking Part in an End-of-Year Academic Book Release Event

Taking Part in an End-of-Year Academic Book Release Event

On 24 December 2013, I took part in the rather longly-worded Press Release of Blue Book of Global Media: Annual Report on the Development of Global Media (2013) and New Media Industries Frontiers and Combined Discussion on Worldwide Communications and New Media Development. (What a mouthful!)

I was here as I was part of a new Chinese-language book on the media, and especially social media. Titled New Media Industries Frontiers (2013), my bit, from page 71, takes a look at China’s social media development and trends.

In particular, I mentioned that the rise of new social media tools, such as WeChat, will change the audience of a message. On Weibo and Twitter, for example, unless you have a private account, what you post will be seen by others — even those you don’t follow or are friends with. On WeChat this is different altogether, as it is seen only with your friends, and nobody you don’t know (unless they’ve copied-and-pasted your message as a rather complicated form of a repost). So whereas a message spreads faster on Weibo and Twitter, it has less reach and impact in comparison if posted just on WeChat. On the other hand, the two are different environments: Weibo is much more for the general public, whilst WeChat is much more between friends.

David Feng: A Host When Not in Class

Posted by on Feb 4, 2004 in Beijing, Public Events, University | No Comments
David Feng: A Host When Not in Class

My history of being a host was rather short. I first hosted an event for foreign students at my university on December 20, 2002. That was a Christmas and New Year’s event. It was pretty fun playing host to the whole thing, even if I was a newbie holding a mike for the first time in front of so many people.

In the autumn of 2003, my English teacher recommended me on the basis of my perfect English to the university’s English department, and to the vice-coordinator of the department. She really wanted me to take part in a nationwide English speaking contest. Sadly, out of nationality reasons (I had a Swiss passport, but they needed someone with a PRC passport), I couldn’t be included. Still, I did the next best thing: host the event at my university. So I became a host on the afternoon of October 30, 2003. I hosted an event which brought out a talent to face others in the nationwide contest.

November 28, 2003, was a very ordinary Friday — till 4 PM. A phone call out of the blue asked me to be a “pingwei” or judge at the university’s English contest semi-finals. The time: 7 PM on Friday evening. The answer: I’m there. A quick dinner was followed up with me jamming the accelerator and getting to the university — fast.

During the break at the event, a student asked me if I would want to host the finals coming on Friday in a week’s time. My immediate answer: YES! I had no idea why or how I would think of hosting the event – but the YES came out just like that. It was a YES, though, that I would never regret.