Chairing the China Media Centre’s First Seminar for Academic Year 2015-2016 – Speaker: Vincent Ni

Chairing the China Media Centre’s First Seminar for Academic Year 2015-2016 – Speaker: Vincent Ni

The average academic talk is where you’ve students all facing one way, staring at a speaker, and then trying to make sense of this. Then you realise that when I do seminars and events, I wanted to make it the exact way both the speaker and attendees want it. We decided shifting tables so that most of us ended up looking at one other — much like a semi-roundtable — would be the best idea. And that’s exactly how the classroom was arranged for the first China Media Centre seminar, which took place today.

Vincent Ni, who’s now with the BBC World Service, came today as speaker to deliver an extremely insightful talk — insightful as it was also thought-provoking and very much what you expected from a distinguished journalist with a lot of experience. He has covered the elections in Myanmar / Burma, the Arab Spring, and much more. He has also worked previously in China-based media, moving recently onwards to media based in the UK.

Taking Part in the 2nd Global China Dialogue at the British Academy

Taking Part in the 2nd Global China Dialogue at the British Academy

My wife Tracy seems to have this urge to push me to challenge after challenge. Most academics default to being shy most of the time, which was why I thought my involvement in this 2nd Global China Dialogue would be, at first, a long ways off. In reality, though, it turned out to be anything but.

My roles were finalised merely days before the event started. I had confirmed roles of being both a Discussant, and a Speaker. I was supposed to offer my 2p regarding how others on the Civilised Dialogue – Transcultural and Comparative discussed the issues of the day, and give a presentation on Urbanisation and the Fabric of China’s Internet.

Spanning two full days, the event featured attendance of up to 70 people, and a great variety of noted speakers, commentators, and specialists from all walks of life.

Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité, Wembley

Liberté, Égalité, Fraternité, Wembley

What has happened on 13 November 2015 in Paris is certainly disconcerting. This is no way to enjoy the night late on Friday. Much as we are aware increasingly of the risk of attacks that “just happen” in the post-9/11 world, nobody expected things to — boom, just happen like that.

Obviously what happened in Paris is just dreadful — it is just so totally wrong when harmless, innocent lives are taken. The fact it happened just on the opposite side of the English Channel also meant it wasn’t too from home, here in London.

World reaction, though, was just one of outright sympathy. Every city that had a major landmark lit it to the colours of the French national flag. The countries closest to me did so as well. Just as of late, Bern donned its Federal Palace the French tricolour; the same happened in Shanghai with the Oriental Pearl Tower. The news from China, in particular, that they decided to join in this, was encouraging, because hitherto I had thought China to be rather ideologically removed from the rest of the world. But it is a positive sign that the country is being taken seriously as a key player on the world stage these days.

But what took my breath away was how this was done in London.

A Beautiful Start to the Beautiful Hebei Picture Expo at the University of Westminster

A Beautiful Start to the Beautiful Hebei Picture Expo at the University of Westminster

Over two hundred people came as the event kicked off in the afternoon hours of 31 October 2015. Local and Chinese media covered the event, and we had speakers and key guests from the University of Westminster, Hebei enterprises (with some making a very long trip over to London from China), and others, including support from the Chinese Embassy in London. The ribbon cutting kicked the event off into gear, with speeches also made (as usual), but a lot of entertainment as well — including Peking Opera, Cheongsam, and solo guitar performances. Messages of congratulations from Hebei in China were also read — it was quite an important event, with 66 pictures of Hebei displayed throughout Fyvie Hall.

Most of us might be wondering why Hebei was “such a big deal”. Here’s why Hebei’s key: It is the “other host” to the 2022 Winter Olympics. Victory on 31 July 2015 has not meant that solely Beijing has nabbed the games whole. Events will be shared between Beijing and Hebei, with central Beijing and Yanqing hosting some events, then Zhangjiakou (specifically Chongli) hosting others. It’s probably not all too nice to win gold in China in 2022 — if you forgot which province you won it from! The other big reason why “Hebei must be it” is the creation of a new megalopolis that will dwarf Tokyo and Yokohama in comparison — Hebei is joining the larger Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei metropolitan region, which will see in the mix the Chinese capital, a central municipality, and dozens of major cities in Hebei. Already now, we’re unifying standards across three jurisdictions so that the greater Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei area is reality sooner. If you’re into major developments in North China, you cannot afford to “just ignore” Hebei.

It was a fantastic time entertaining visitors, and me and the other host pulled this off in both English and Chinese, often with one person alternating between these two languages on the fly (even if just for a bit). For once, it was quite an experience introducing senior academics I work with (instead of myself being introduced by the distinguished scholar, which happened more frequently my end!) onto the stage — there was a lot of mutual appreciation.

Organising the Autumn 2015 China Media Centre Fresher Party

Organising the Autumn 2015 China Media Centre Fresher Party

The month of October 2015 has been increasingly busy for me — first was getting things right for the University of Westminster & SMG event on 21 October 2015, and today, it was all about getting as many people together as possible for the China Media Centre’s Fresher Party, which in spite of rather short notice, meant a crowd turned up — and it was a big one at that. We just about ran out of seating in one of the university’s larger classrooms!

There was obviously cake to go along, as well as a lot of drinks (I had spent the afternoon getting these back from the local Sainsbury’s along with other Centre staff members). Before this, though, both Centre director Prof de Burgh and I briefed all those here with what the Centre was up to. I also announced my role as the organiser of all academic seminars for the year 2015/2016, and that we’d be having people over to present still within this term.

Mind the Gap? Tube lines in London, Beijing, and Shanghai

Posted by on Oct 4, 2015 in Beijing, London, Shanghai, Trains, Travel | No Comments
Mind the Gap? Tube lines in London, Beijing, and Shanghai

I’ve done the entire London Tube system before I tackled those in Beijing and Shanghai, and I’ve been in both cities in China longer than what some might call “healthy”. (For Beijing, that’s 14 years in one go; for Shanghai, these included two visits in just one month in July 2009.)

So when my wife thought it was high time to “guide Brits coming into China for the trains”, I thought that it was also high time to introduce Britons to the way the rails work in China. Apart from a full-fledged post on Tracking China, I also took the time to compare the Beijing and Shanghai equivalents of London’s Central, Metropolitan, Northern, Piccadilly, and Victoria lines — or what could be the closest equivalents.

And this is when I ask all Londoners, Beijingers, and Shanghai folks to chime in. Is what I am posting below absolute rubbish — or can you somehow relate to these?…

My, That’s A Lot for Today

My, That’s A Lot for Today

I did something I haven’t been doing for a fair while today at 14:30: speaking in front of an audience of 100+ people. (Stage fright is a one-off thing, though; never mind my last speaking gig in front of close to 100+ was in spring 2014…)

My 30-minute “blah” was about a myriad of things — all related to media, journalism, and the like. Things such as framing the news, covert (and not so covert) agendas, and pigeon-holing people. Things such as really trying to make sense of anything from the refugee crisis in Europe to Corbyn leading Labour (what the media thought, and what the academics thought). Things such as how social media was such a big game-changer, and how the Chinese Great Firewall couldn’t 100% define what happened inside the People’s Republic.

Tubed!

Posted by on Sep 6, 2015 in London, Trains, Travel, United Kingdom | No Comments
Tubed!

16:43:13 on 05 September 2015. As the District line train rolled into Richmond station, that was it for me — I had just travelled the entire length of all publicly advertised lines on the London Underground. Quite coincidentally, I had also finished all of the lines on the DLR and Tramlink networks.

The only bit of the rail networks I’ve still to do are all Overground routes, as well as all stations on National Rail. I’ll probably get these done before my upgrade to Beijing as early as mid-2016. The Overground does, however, leave me in awe — at just how it managed to pass through the oldest tunnel in London (for sure) — the Rotherhithe tunnel.

Singing the Praises of the Borismaster

Posted by on Jun 16, 2015 in London, United Kingdom | No Comments
Singing the Praises of the Borismaster

Boris might be remembered for that insane Circle line party where everyone went stark staring mad right before 01 June 2008, getting massively drunk, but he’s also very much remembered for the New Bus for London, which some of us have no problem renaming after Mayor Boris Johnson.

To me, this is the kind of stuff only Boris and Jony Ive might be able to pull off. The idea of the open platform, always ready to let passengers hop on and off when the bus is not moving, is fantastic — and highly efficient. Especially for those of us here for a fair bit in London, it’s a fantastic way to explore un-touristy London. If I feel lethargic just after lunchtime, I’d be on one of these and hop right off where there’s a caffeine refuelling station — either for free against a quick purchase (Waitrose), or as large and powerful as humanly conceivable (Costa and Starbucks). If I wanted a quick wifi connection, it’d be a Caffé Nero, Café Rouge, or any roadside alternative. For a quick top-up shop, it might be a quick hop over to Sainsbury’s.

Trying Out TfL Rail — or Crossrail Public Beta

Posted by on May 31, 2015 in London, Trains, United Kingdom | No Comments
Trying Out TfL Rail — or Crossrail Public Beta

Consider it Mac OS X Public Beta for London’s rail & tube network. Within a couple of years, TfL Rail will give way to the mighty monster we’ve all been dying for (felt the most when Oxford Circus is no different than Xizhimen in Beijing, or People’s Square in Shanghai, underground trains-wise) — Crossrail.

I have always had this manic compulsion, of sorts, of trying new trains the moment they roll out. Sometimes, I get interviewed; more often than not, though, it’s just a secretive little trip to test the new system. Now in the case of TfL Rail services from Liverpool Street to Brentwood and Shenfield, I actually cheated by taking an Abellio Greater Anglia train some time back straight to Shenfield (where the Oyster card reader happily feasted itself on my pay-as-you-go credit; I was dim-witted to cram in with other commuters — not the most pleasant ride, obviously; plus you pay more during rush hour!). So this time, I actually took a train out to Brentwood, and in the process, snapped picture of almost all stations enroute.

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