Baoji-Lanzhou HSR: Linking Western and Eastern China

Baoji-Lanzhou HSR: Linking Western and Eastern China

This new line goes through an incredibly mountainous part of Central and Western China, zipping through Tianshui, Dingxi, and other stations. Along with wife Tracy, I got to ride on the new line out from Xi’an North to Xining, incorporating the Baoji-Lanzhou bit, and got a look at Lanzhou West Railway Station. (Some have deemed that to be one of the lesser well-done HSR hubs, but I see it quite differently.)

Much of the line appeared to be familiar to me — remember I had been to all stations on the Xi’an-Baoji HSR, so it was only after we left Baoji South that the new bit of the line meant I was looking out the window. Quite a bit. Or at that, just a bit. The new high speed line went through probably a million tunnels, this being a very mountainous part of China.

When we did have a look at the countryside, I had to look very closely at a station we were only going to zip through — Dongcha Railway Station. Media interviews included me looking away to see if I’d finally snapped Dongcha station (I did do that on tape, or rather video), as the station was very unique. Initially it was intended only to be a place where trains would overtake one other — ie let slower trains take a breather whilst faster ones zipped by. However, they eventually converted this to a proper station. And not any station: Dongcha would feature, as I saw on pics released just before the line opened to the general public, a rather long, all-enclosed elevated walkway from the station building to the platforms, as they weren’t exactly under the HSR rail line viaduct.

World Premiere (Almost): China Railway Revival Express High Speed Train

Posted by on Jun 28, 2017 in China, Trains | No Comments
World Premiere (Almost): China Railway Revival Express High Speed Train

So after filming three more stations on 27 June 2017, we got back to Beijing late that evening and hopped right onto Train G123 the next day. Yes, 48 hours late, somewhat inexcusable for the Shanzhai Sheldon Cooper of Beijing, but oh well.

The new Revival Express train is in red. This to me is an excellent choice for colour… even before 1949, red was seen as a very Chinese colour. When people got married, it’s known as a “red party”. Enterprises are established at lavish parties where guests of honour wear “red tags” with a red flower and baskets of flowers (fake or real) are draped with ribbons of red. Over Chinese New Year, money is stuffed in red packets. Coincidentally, the present-day largest-denomination banknote, CNY 100.—, is pinkish-red. Red was also the colour of the walls around Tian’anmen, Zhongnanhai, and the Forbidden City. So it made sense to have a red train literally in the China of the same colour!

TEDxFengdongSquare: Reliving the Trains Keynote

Posted by on Jun 26, 2017 in China, Public Events, Public Speaking, Trains | No Comments
TEDxFengdongSquare: Reliving the Trains Keynote

It’s a funny kind of day, and it’s all about trains. Brilliant skies today in this part of Central Western China as I’m on my way out west to Baoji (never tried that on the new HSR line), and the launch of the new Revival trains on the Beijing-Shanghai HSR. All trains, promised. But the big thing: TEDx.

To have mic access as a keynote speaker as in being the first onstage — that was something I hadn’t been expecting for quite a while. But to do this on the TEDx stage as the lead speaker was just absolutely wild.

My 18 minute talk (which I nailed with only about half a minute more to spare) was about my documentary, Next Station: China, that’s in the making, but far more also about how I’ve come to discover and appreciate the views, the items evoking curiosity, and the plain unexpected in doing this documentary.

Live on Radio Beijing: Of Trains and Stations!

Posted by on Jun 14, 2017 in Beijing 2022, Media Appearances, Trains | No Comments
Live on Radio Beijing: Of Trains and Stations!

It’s been a very, very long time since I’ve stepped back into that live studio at Radio Beijing (as in the English-language services)… The show was Touch Beijing, a live show mostly in English, but with a fair bit of spoken Mandarin Chinese as well. I came in around 25 minutes past the hour (17:25 or so), for my 20-ish minutes of fame (or so). The rail documentary I was doing, Next Station: China, took, of course, centre stage.

Up to this point, I had “sped up” going to stations — I literally just returned yesterday from Shidu Railway Station, Station 51 right by the mountains in southwestern Beijing. The past 50 journeys have seen me around much of Beijing, Tianjin, Hebei, He’nan, and Shandong, but also as far south as Hu’nan! Were there a few of my favourites already? Absolutely. Old Regular Rail stations made up for the bulk of unexpected discoveries.

Get Out Into the World: Jijiaying, Miyun

Get Out Into the World: Jijiaying, Miyun

“Get out into the world. (F*ck yeah you good thing.)” My new cuss-included iPhone weather app liked the weather in this part of remote northeastern rural Beijing. We went to Jijiaying, Miyun, one of the slightly more remote and less advantaged parts of the Beijing suburbs — to bring our English lessons there and to show that we cared.

First off, we had the bit where Alison Zhou, who co-hosted not just the radio shows at Radio Beijing in 2013 with me, but plenty of these pro bono English public talks as well, did a lesson on English and the Winter Olympics along with me…. Then onto the main event: shooting some kind of publicity video, pretty much to get everyone excited about learning English for 2022. Everyone got their 15 attoseconds of fame.

I can tell you that even if this was early-to-mid-May, it felt scorching hot. No wonder at all, in actual fact: I remember 2001 temperatures this time of year (early May) to be probably 30+ Celsius. At least 31°C. I read that on one of those digitised displays (whether it got correctly calibrated would be another issue, but still the writing is on the wall).

Two Tickets, Two Mics, One Topic: Trains!

Posted by on Apr 22, 2017 in China, Media Appearances, Trains | No Comments
Two Tickets, Two Mics, One Topic: Trains!

That’s me having just completed an interview with Radio Beijing about the Next Station: China trip I’m doing right now. Finish all railway stations on the mainland of China by early 2022. (Now you just have to make a real effort!)

I’ve really been into discovering stations since I stumbled upon the Tanggu-Beijing high speed trains (I thought they used to go only as far as Central Tianjin). Since that time, I’ve been hooked. Unhappy with “just” Beijing South, Tianjin, and Shanghai being the sole three stations I’ve visited and taken a trip from in 2008, I’ve been dreaming of doing a “rail stations atlas”. The documentary, hopefully, will make this one come alive.

Coffee, Tea, or Stations?

Posted by on Mar 28, 2017 in China, Trains | No Comments
Coffee, Tea, or Stations?

About the most ridiculous “cutesy Chinese girly phrase” these days is the über-cute — and at that, extremely infantile — Coffee, tea, or me?. But there is something less silly in the form of trains — and the stations they call at.

There’s a whole new website out — Next Station: China — which is my new documentary, going after all national railway stations in China. Of course, Geoff Marshall and Vicki Pipe of All the Stations must also have all the fun going after an equally big network in the UK (there are 2,306 stations in China — mainland only, so far — the UK has 2,500+ stations — you lucky people!). Also, it’d be kind of cool if two rail documentaries were being shot at the same time across two countries.

The idea is to completely visit every single station open to the public on the mainland of China, They must be open to all (locals and expats), and have full ticketing facilities. I myself won’t be too happy with a mere stop-push-door-open-button-snap-push-door-close-button-go jaunt. I’m allowing myself upwards of nearly five years to totally explore the network, at a time when the HSR network is being doubled from a 4×4 network to an 8×8 one.

Test Driving China’s All-New High Speed Trainset: the CR400

Posted by on Feb 25, 2017 in China, Trains | No Comments
Test Driving China’s All-New High Speed Trainset: the CR400

We still don’t officially have a name for this new monster yet, but it’s there: the new CR400 trains. Both the Golden and Blue trains, coupled into one, came out as Train G65 today at Beijing West. Of course my wife Tracy joined the first trip; she hardly misses a beat!

On the inside, there are already a few novelties, and you can discover more on my Twitter feed, where there are even more pics of the train we took today. Welcome features include a new sink outside the toilets, child lock protection for the hot water machine, new unified PA alert tones (using the same tones as announcements at newer stations), and “softer beeping” when doors close.

The coupled train took centre stage, but interestingly enough, missing were the hordes of cameras and microphones, as it was seen more as a “soft launch”, although before we left, we did see a China Central TV reporter with the mic and camera kit on the platform.

Chunyun 2017: Off to a Bilingual Start

Posted by on Jan 13, 2017 in Trains, Transport | No Comments
Chunyun 2017: Off to a Bilingual Start

Every year, at this time, we’d see millions and billions take to the rails, roads, and air, as this nation of 1.3+ billion and coming make their way home to their ancestral homes — back to their grandparents and parents — just for that classic meal, the dinner on New Year’s Eve in the Chinese calendar… For 2017, I’ve decided to take part in this by not just launching a Twitter topic on it (#Chunyun), but to make a difference and trial new brochures helping people. And also to broadcast this live to the wider world audience.

It’s been said Chinese railway tickets are a blessing and a curse. The blessing being that you’re booked onto one train, with one credit card-sized ticket telling you everything from which gate to use, which train you’re booked onto, when you’ll set off, and what seat will be yours. Unfortunately, the curse is that they’re all in Mandarin Chinese…

Except for that I didn’t want this to hold true forever. Having talked to quite a number of seasoned expat travellers, I decided to create (using Apple Pages) a brochure describing what this, that, or the other thing would be on the ticket — in both Mandarin Chinese and English. There was also a card for passengers who’d have lost their ticket, and need help getting a replacement.

Shanghai’s Very New High Speed Link to Yunnan

Posted by on Dec 28, 2016 in Guizhou, Opening of New Lines, Trains, Yunnan | No Comments
Shanghai’s Very New High Speed Link to Yunnan

Lucky Yunnan! They’re officially part of the Chinese national HSR network as of today, with the opening in full of the Shanghai-Kunming HSR, including the just-opened-part between Kunmingnan (Kunming South) and Guiyangbei (Guiyang North) termini.

Of course Twitter was all abuzz with this… With me just recently verified on the service, how can you not expect this to be big news? For a part of the country “starved” of any fast, reliable rail service, the opening of the Shanghai-Kunming HSR seemed to be the news of the day.

Except for it wasn’t. In addition to getting the new HSR to Guiyang and Shanghai opened, there were two other express routes opened today — a new line to Guangxi (terminating ultimately in Nanning) and a short sprinter service to Yuxi. I’ll have to try both of these another day.

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