A Year of Next Station: China…

Posted by on Apr 18, 2018 in China, Media Appearances, Trains | No Comments

21:41 (UTC+08:00), 18 APR 2018 | CHN CHAOYANGMEN

This time a year ago, I left on Train G1 to Nanjing South and Hefei South. A year later, I’m in front of a microphone — not on a train — though at times both have happened at the same time…

The people at Radio Beijing timed the live show to happen exactly a year after the documentary started. We’re far from done, and even a little behind schedule — if I said the trek should visit 3 stations every 2 days, then we should’ve hit 548 stations, and the rather measly 301 isn’t too great. But it has shown me China beyond any dimension imaginable.

Pretty much wherever I’ve set up my camera and microphone — wired or wireless — I’ve been an item of curiosity. I’ve been identified by a member of the public once — at Wuxi Railway Station — but otherwise they’re rather low-key. There’s a reason I keep it like that — to uncover the station as-is, without anything extra (without any extras, in fact). Yes we obviously make sure everything is spotless and that we don’t have crazy people the opposite side of the white line — and of course I remain pretty much in areas open to the public (because even if the command centre, as an example, might be imaginably pretty cool, if you can’t gain public access to it, it won’t help you out if you’re lost at a station!).

Interestingly, Radio Beijing has a trains element to it too. Ex-presenter Bruce (from Bruce in Beijing) travelled to China on a train… way back in the 1980s and 1990s, when places in Southern China had only Classic Rail, as in the epic Green Trains. Today, though, it’s all very much high speed…

That’s just the first year. There’s plenty more to go into the second year. I left Station 301 as Luohe West Railway Station (Station 300 was Hankou, as you can see in the pic; awesome station!). But if I had taken the time to travel about an hour and a half further south to Xianning North — the first-ever intermediate station after Wuhan — which has been in existence for nearly 10 years… see, there’s so much left to be discovered…

…And with that in mind (and thanks for the interview!), it’s off to the next many, many stations. Please get ready for your arrival!